Pot Pie (AIP-friendly low-FODMAP)

Chicken pot pieI used to make a rustic top-crust pot pie back in the SAD old days & it was the one dinner that all the kids agreed that they loved. My #4 bonus kid still wistfully asks for it sometimes. This AIP-friendly (& low-FODMAP!) version uses a parsnip-carrot dough that feels very like my old pot pie pastry when chilled. Pot pie reinvented!

Pot Pie Pastry

The pastry needs to be started the day before & can be made up to several days in advance.

  • 6 modest-sized parsnips
  • 3 carrots
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil
  • 1 tsp Himalayan salt (or similar)

Preheat oven to 350parsnips & carrots

Peel & slice the parsnips & carrots into short sticks, something like this:

Melt half the coconut oil (3 tablespoons). Use your hands to ensure all the sticks are coated with the oil. Roast for 40 minutes, stirring several times, especially toward the end.

Put the roasted roots into a food processor with the rest of the coconut oil (3 more tablespoons) and a generous teaspoon of salt. Whirl until a thick batter or soft dough is formed.

Use a spatula to remove the dough to a storage container and refrigerate overnight.

The next day press the dough out into a pie-shape on the countertop. Use a metal spatula to lift it carefully away from the counter surface and lay it over the filling in a baking dish. It’s soft dough. It might rip. But that’s okay because this pie is rustic. Just patch it up.

At this point you can pop it back in the fridge until you want to cook it.

Pot Pie Filling

The whole point of pot pie, really, is to transform leftover meat into something new & delicious. Use roast chicken, baked salmon, pot roast, or leftover ground beef & balsamic blueberries from last night’s tacos.

  • I used the cooked equivalent of 1½ lbs uncooked ground beef and ½ cup of leftover balsamic blueberries to make a fabulous pot pie.
  • In another pie I used most of the meat from a smallish roast chicken. The bones, skin & pan drippings were already in my slowcooker becoming bone broth, so this was the perfect way to turn the chicken meat into something fancy. I squeezed the juice of an orange over the chicken before I put the pasty on, to favourable effect.

Once assembled, bake your pie at 350 for 35-40 minutes until hot with browned edges.

The pastry will be quite soft when hot and a little firmer as it cools.

44 thoughts on “Pot Pie (AIP-friendly low-FODMAP)

      1. Most definitely. Red Palm Oil would be the easiest substitute & it would also enhance the orange colour of the pastry. I’d also be inclined to try lard, as it was the fat of choice of all those pastry-making grandmas back in the day. I haven’t tried lard, so the recipe might need adjustment. Just be sure it’s lard from happy pigs. If you get a happy pork roast with a good thick layer of fat on it, cook it in a slow cooker on low for a long time & you’ll end up with your own rendered lard. Just pour it into a container & refrigerate.

      1. You can use a Pin It button via Chrome or somewhere but they seem to be having problems. But it works when there is a pin it button on the person’s post which is good. You go to Pinterest and set up an account and then add a pin it button wherever you like: https://en.help.pinterest.com/entries/21101982

        However, I think you look like you are on WordPress so you should already have a Pinterest button in widgets.

        My pinterest board is http://www.pinterest.com/trulyglutenfree and I am just starting an AIP recipes board there and I like some of yours, hence the question 🙂

      2. Thanks for the tips, Micki! Maybe my wordpress theme doesn’t include a Pinterest widget because it’s not on the list. I’ll investigate setting up a Pinterest account on the weekend…

  1. S’ok I have managed it :). There was a problem with the Chrome installation and I have fixed it so no rush. Might be useful for others though. And a Follow me on Pinterest button is quite good. If you want to see one, I have one in the right hand side menu of my TGF site here: http://www.trulyglutenfree.co.uk. Good luck!

    1. I hope this does it for you! For someone coming straight from the SAD-pastry-paradigm it might require a recalibration of the concept known as pastry, but those of us on the AIP who have already reorganized our conceptions, it’s awesome!

  2. Hi! Love the blog and I very much want to try this recipe. Do you think another root/vegetable could be used in place of parsnips?? I have not been able to find any 😦

    1. You could definitely experiment. It’s about experimentation! I used parsnips & carrots because they are the only 2 root vegetables that seemed to always show up on the low-FODMAP lists. Some other root vegetables show up on both low & high FODMAP lists. Also, parsnips have a slightly waxy texture when baked that reminded me of my old pot pie pastry & it was that texture that provoked this recipe.

      & thank you…!

  3. When I made this pot pie,looks totally beautiful when comes out of the oven. The crust melted into the filling once served. The result was a very rich and tasty stew.

      1. Mine melted in also, was totally heaven. I do miss the crusts that hold up. But the taste—-fantastic!

  4. Would this recipe call for 6 small parsnips? I’ve seen some in my grocery store that are pretty large so I just want to make sure I don’t get too much.

  5. I made this as a chicken pot pie with some mire poix, some bone broth, some salt and herbs and chicken pieces. I did the crust with the parsnips and carrots as directed, but I added the paleo mom’s mixture for her root vegetable biscuits recipe to the parsnips and carrots to make the crust hold up better. I rolled out the topping to make the crust. It was beautiful, and it held up just fine after cooking it. I thought it was quite tasty as well. So, this version of the crust would have more starch in it since the biscuit recipe calls for coconut flour, tapioca starch, and arrowroot starch.

    1. I don’t tend to use any flours or starches as I like to go for maximum nutrient density & minimum processing, but I totally agree: that would make for a more robust crust~! Sounds like a great variation.

  6. I am so very grateful for this recipe. I can’t tolerate the usual coconut flour, almond flour, and root starches, and this is the first crust recipe I’ve seen that doesn’t include them. Desperately crave something crust-like, so thanks so much!

  7. Petra, Petra, Petra, for the lady who “hates” cooking you totally created a masterpiece with this. I have had this bookmarked for so long its embarrassing. I finally made it and am I kicking myself for taking so long. Masterful, Delicious and oh so satisfying. BUT you should have some warnings on it.
    Warning 1 – try not to eat too much of the pastry as you are rolling it out or else you wont have enough for your pies.
    Warning 2 – Cook it when you plan to eat it because if for some silly reason you thought you would cook it to have later think again, this wont last to the cooling down stage they taste that good.
    Thanks the whole family loved especially the 3 year old who declared it the best ever.
    I so enjoy your blog and hope your adrenals are on the recovery track. Healing vibes your way.

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