Ancestral Eating (& decolonizing our food)

Ancestral eating croppedA couple hundred years after my ancestors destroyed the food systems of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas we’ve started our very own ancestral food movement.

And most Indigenous people, after generations of marginalization, colonization and cultural (as well as literal) genocide aren’t in a position to afford to eat ancestrally, unless they managed to maintain their traditional hunting, fishing and gathering practices.

I wrote about this once already in My Ancestors came from Candy-land.

But I need to write about it again.

Please! When you come, bring Moose, Venison, Beaver, Bear or Salmon~

A tour of Southwestern Canada last summer by Unist’ot’en Hereditary Chiefs to gather support for theĀ Unist’ot’en’s stand against the construction of fossil fuel pipelines through Northern British Columbia included an event in Victoria, where I live.

Venison pot roast, present & future 2

Venison pot roast, present & future~

Event organizers made an urgent request on behalf of the Unist’ot’en delegation: “Our guests eat a meat and fish rich diet. If you are in any position to bring any wild game – moose, venison, beaver, bear or salmon, any of these are most appreciated.”

Those of us who eat ancestrally can appreciate the challenge of finding food while traveling. Wanting to be gracious guests while trying to find anything (anything?) that resembles real food in faraway lands.

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